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Immediate
Christine Morganti
(505) 797-6028
cmorganti@nmbar.org

Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010 Means Changes for Indian Country

Albuquerque, N.M.—For lawyers involved in criminal cases in Indian Country, learning about the new Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010 and its implications is crucial.
  The act will give tribes and the federal government the necessary tools to address complex jurisdictional issues by enhancing the Indian Country criminal justice system and improving coordination and communication. The act also provides for increased penalties that tribes may impose under the Indian Civil Rights Act. However, certain civil rights and due process requirements must be met by the tribe in order to impose such increased sentences, which means tribes may be required to amend current tribal criminal laws in order to meet the new requirements under the act.
  The Tribal Law & Order Act: Changes in the Landscape of Indian Criminal Law, a continuing legal education program sponsored by the State Bar Indian Law Section, will be offered Nov. 4 at the State Bar Center in Albuquerque.
Speakers include Helen B. Padilla, director of the American Indian Law Center; John Harte, San Felipe Pueblo, Mapetsi Policy Group and former policy director, U.S. Senate Indian Affairs Committee; and Professor Barbara Creel (Jemez Pueblo), UNM School of Law.
  A panel will discuss the different roles of lawyers in criminal cases in Indian Country. The panelists are Kyle Nayback (Sault Ste. Marie Chippewa), assistant U.S. attorney, Albuquerque; Steve McCue, federal public defender, District of New Mexico; Carrie Martell, assistant tribal prosecutor, Hopi Tribe; David Adams, tribal prosecutor, Pueblo of Laguna; and Delilah Choneska, (Santo Domingo Pueblo), New Mexico Legal Aid, Native American Program.

Visit http://www.nmbarcle.org/catalog.aspx?browse=ViewProg&catid=1259 to register.

Note: News media are welcome to attend and cover the sessions. Please notify Christine Morganti, cmorganti@nmbar.org or (505) 797-6028 if you plan to attend.

The State Bar of New Mexico was organized in 1886 and is composed of more than 8500 members. Its purposes are to aid the courts in administering justice and preserving the rule of law, and to foster a high standard of integrity and competence within the legal profession.

The State Bar of New Mexico was organized in 1886 and is composed of more than 8500 members. Its purposes are to aid the courts in administering justice and preserving the rule of law, and to foster a high standard of integrity and competence within the legal profession.